Explain what's going on to someone who's been cryogenically frozen


#1

Long and long texts. Dare I say drama? Not unified. Not powerful. It feels like the fall of the Roman Empire.

Alexander Demandt enumerated 210 different theories on why Rome fell. It’s mostly about division and contrasts.

I have some questions for active knowledgeable community members:

  1. How would you explain what is currently going on with NEM to someone that has been frozen for the past few years?
  2. What is a POI vote?
  3. What is at stake?
  4. How much stake does one need to be eligible to cast a vote?
  5. Does a vote hold the power to cast judgment over instances such as “resources were intentionally not shared even though they could be useful to other regions”?
  6. Are candidates divisible in opposing groups with a certain vision?
  7. Could we compile a list of questions that all candidates should answer?

My question would be: Is Yoshitaka Sakurada a good or bad choice for the office of cyber security, and why?


#3

We don’t seek Yoshitaka Sakurada.


#4

It could easily be that all 210 theories are correct. Rome did not perish for one but several reasons. If you are looking for comparisons to Nem, then I would say costs and arrogance.

For all other questions, I recommend you:
https://nem.io/technology/


https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1jSOmzN8XiDGzSmdJeFRa1lr4UaRAkz11


#5

This is interesting! I had googled and found this - https://www.scmp.com/comment/insight-opinion/article/2174914/time-get-serious-about-cybersecurity

Ideally, you want someone with the right background to lead but if that can’t be helped, you then find someone with the right relationships, political mileage and ability to perform in a managing something new.

This is a very good question. NEM should be treated like any other ‘foundations’ with a mandate to simply - develop, promote and protect the NEM blockchain technology platform.